New succulents, Cactus and Sansevierias that will be available this Spring at Peacock Horticultural Nursery.

New succulents, Cactus and Sansevierias that will be available this Spring at Peacock Horticultural Nursery:

  • Aloe ferox (one gallon pots) – Cape Aloe – A single stemmed Aloe to 6 – 9′ tall and 3 – 5′ wide.  Orange flower spikes occur in late winter.  Plant in full sun and needs little water once established.  Hardy to about 20 F, although flowers may be damaged at about 24 F.
  • Aloe Goliath (one gallon pots) – A large Aloe to 8 – 12′ tall and 4 – 5′ wide.  Thought to be a cross of Aloe barberae and A. vaombe.  Salmon to orange flowers in winter.  Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Aloe Walmsley’s Bronze Variegated (4″ pots) – a clumping, small succulent forming rosettes to about 6″ tall and wide with dark green leaves with streaks of white and light green. Leaves will turn bronze in more light.  Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Aloe wickensii (4″ pots) A succulent that forms a solitary rosette to about 2 – 3′ tall and wide. Bi-colored flower of red and yellow in winter.  Plant in full sun to part sun in well draining soil.  Hardy to about 20 F.
  • Astrophytum capricorne (4″pots) Goat’s Horns Cactus – Solitary round cactus with eight ribs when young but then becomes more columnar with age up to 4′ tall.  Fragrant yellow flowers with a red centera in summer.  Plant in a well draining cactus mix and water regularly during the growing season (summer).  Keep dry in winter.  Hardy to about 20 – 25 F if dry.
  • Bromelia pinguin (4″ pots) – Bromeliad – A terrestrial bromeliad with rosettes of silver green leaves that are extremely prickly to 3 – 4′.  Flower stalk is reddish with white flowers. Edible fruit tastes like pineapple. Grow in part shade in well draining soil.  Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Cereus Blue Taffy – (6″ pots) – A crested cultivar that looks much like the crested form of Cereus forbesii. Grows to 12″ by 6″ in well draining soil.  Probably no frost.
  • Cereus peruvianus monstrosus – These are seedling from a monstrose version of this plant.  I will hold onto these see if they are interesting.
  • Diocorea elephantipes (4″ pots) Elephants Foot – A perennial deciduous caudiciform vine. The caudex (water storing organ) can reach 2 – 3′ and more with vining foliage in winter/spring. Withhold water when green growth dies back. Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Echinopsis macrogona (4″ pots) (aka Trichocereus macrogonus)  This genus is a mess.  These are reported to be much the same as Echinopsis peruviana with the spines being brown or red on E. macrogona. A columnar cactus to 13′ tall and 7.5″ in diameter.  Plant in full sun to bright light. Large night blooming white flowers. Reported to be hardy to as low as -9 C = 15.8 F for short periods.
  • Echinopsis pachanoi (2 gallon pots) San Pedro Cactus – A large, multi-stemmed columnar cactus to 10 to 20′ tall and 6′ wide. Large white, night blooming flowers in summer. These cactus prefer regular water during the growing season and best dry in the winter. Plant in full sun (morning sun), although they may burn if hot sun. Hardy to about 10 – 15 F.
  • Echinopsis strigosa (4″ pots) A columnar cactus to about 2′ tall and 2.5″ in diameter forming clumps up to 3′.  May have a creeping habit. White flowers in summer.  Plant in full sun to bright light.  Reported to be hardy to about 20 F.
  • Echinopsis tercheckii – Argentine Saguaro (one gallon pots) – A large columnar cactus producing arms with age. Grows to 30 to 40′ tall. Very large white flowers that bloom at night and only last until the following afternoon. Plant in full sun to bright light and hardy to about 15 F.
  • Edithcolea grandis Lake Boringa, Kenya (4″ pots) Persian Carpet Flower – A succulent in the stapelioid  group with amazing flowers.  Branched stems grow to about 12″.  Plants should be kept warm (> 60 F) and dry in winter.  Water regularly during the summer growing season when soil is dry.  Grow in bright light.
  • Euphorbia caput-medusae (one and two gallon pots) A medusoid Euphorbia with many branches (up to 2 – 3′ long) produced from a caudex up to 8″ wide. Plant in full sun at the coast to light shade inland. Hardy to about 23 F, and drought tolerant. Warning: this plant contains white sap that may be irritating to skin and eyes. Do not ingest.
  • Euphorbia polygona Bethelsdorp – From seed collected near Bethelsdorp, South Africa.  A columnar cactus to 1 to 5′ tall and 3 to 4″ in diameter.  Small purple flowers. Can form clumps up to 3’+ wide with columns of various heights.  Grow in light shade to full sun.  The general rule being that the smaller and rounder the variety, the less sun that it can tolerate. Reported hardy to 25 F, and even 15 F if soil is dry.  Warning: this plant contains white sap that may be irritating to skin and eyes.  Do not ingest.
  • Euphorbia gorgonis (4″ pots)
  • Euphorbia horrida nova (4″ pots)
  • Euphorbia horrida var striata
  • Euphorbia inermis var inermis
  • Euphorbia makallensis (one gallon pots)
  • Euphorbia pseudoburuana
  • Euphorbia pulvinata VDV 366
  • Gymnocalicium tucavocense (4″ pots)
  • Haworthia Chocolate (4″ pots)
  • Hawothia cymbiformis variegated (4″ pots)
  • Mammillaria sempervivi (4″ pots)
  • Melocactus matanzanus
  • Rebutia steinbachii ssp tiraquesis (4″ pots)
  • Sansevieria francisii FKH 432 (6″ pots)
  • Sansevieria grandis (2 gallon pots)
  • Sansevieria sp. aff rorida LAV 23154
  • Sansevieria t. var hahnii Gold Star (6″ pots)
  • Stapelia gigantea
  • Trichocereus huasha (4″ pots)
  • Trichocereus

New plants arriving this week at Peacock Horticultural Nursery

Aloe africana

New plants arriving today and available now at Peacock Horticultural Nursery:

  • Aloe africana – (6″ pots  & 5 gallon pots) A small tree Aloe to 6 – 8′ and 2 – 4′ wide with orange flower buds that open yellow typically in winter.  Plant in full sun in well draining soil.  Low water needs once established.  Hardy to about 25 F.

Aloe africana

Aloe africana

  • Aloe ferox – (2 gallons pots) – A solitary Aloe to 6 – 8′ and 3 – 5′ wide with orange flower typically in fall/winter. Plant in full sun in well draining soil. Low water needs once established. Hardy to about 20 F, although flowers may be damaged at around 24 F.

Aloe ferox

  • Cereus peruvianus monstrosus  (2 gallon pots) A columnar blue-green cactus growing to about 15’+ with a twisting, irregular undulating pattern on the stem ribs. Occasional white flowers bloom at night.  Hardy to about 20 – 25 F.

Cereus peruvianus monstosus

  • Echinopsis pachanoi  – San Pedro Cactus – (5 gallon pots) – A large, multi-stemmed columnar cactus to 10 to 20′ tall and 6′ wide.  Large white, night blooming flowers in summer.  These cactus prefer regular water during the growing season and best dry in the winter.  Plant in full sun (morning sun), although they may burn if hot sun.  Hardy to about 10 – 15 F.

Echinopsis pachanoi San Pedro Cactus

 

  • Echinopsis terscheckii – Argentine Saguaro – (3 gallon pots) – A large columnar cactus producing arms with age.  Grows to 30 to 40′ tall.  Very large white flowers that bloom at night and only last until the following afternoon.  Plant in full sun to bright light and hardy to about 15 F.

Echinopsis terscheckii

  • Encephalartos altensteinii x lehmannii – (5 gallon pots) – A cross producing a beautiful cycad with long blue-silver-green leaves.  Plant in full sun and hardy to about 25 F.

Encephalartos altersteinii x lehmannii

  • Euphorbia trigona ‘Royal Red’ – African Milk Tree – (4″ pots) – Be cautious of white sap!  Avoid getting sap on skin or eyes.  A succulent to about 6′ with triangular stems that are flushed purplish-red. Grow in full sun to bright light and protect from frost in winter.  Water only during the growing season.

Euphorbia trigona Ruby Red

  • Leucadendron ‘Spider’ – Spider Pincuchion – (5 gallon pots) – An evergreen shrub to about 6 – 8′ tall and 5 – 10 ‘ wide with salmon and golden-yellow pincushion flowers in late spring to early summer.  Plant in full sun in well draining  soil and hardy to about 25 F.

Leucospermum ‘Spider’

  • Opuntia microdasys var. albispina – Bunny-ear Prickly Pear – (6″ pots) – Succulent forming many small pads with white hair-like glochids covering the pads.  Be very careful not to get these glochid in your skin!  Yellow flowers followed by red fruits.  Hardy to 25 F in winter if sol is kept dry.

Opuntia microdasys var. albispina

  • Sansevieria cylindrica ‘Patula’ – (3 gallon pots) – Great houseplant for bright light.  Water only when dry and very water required in winter.  Not hardy.

Sansevieria cylindrica Patula

  • Sedum morganianum Burrito- Burro’s Tail – (6″ pots) – Trailing succulent up to 3″.  Great for hanging pots.  Needs plenty of bright light.  Water only when dry.  Not hardy.

Sedum m. ‘Burrito’

  • Sterlitzia nicolai – White Bird Of Paradise – (2 gallon pots) – Clump forming tropical foliage plant to 20’+ for full sun to part shade.  Nice container plant indoors.  White flowers.  Hardy to about 25 F.

Sterlitzia nicolai

New succulents available at Peacock Horticultural Nursery

Euphorbia gorgonis

I brought many new succulents into the nursery last month and have been growing them on.  The following is a list of newly available succulents (or available later this spring in some cases):

  • Aloe aculeata – Prickly Aloe – A solitary, stemless Aloe growing to about 18″.  Flowering in winter with orange flowers.  The plants are very hardy to 20 F, although the flowers are not as hardy as the plant.  Plant in full sun.
  • Aloe betsileensis – Bertileo Aloe – Solitary and nearly stemless Aloe to 12″ to 18″ with bluish leaves with red teeth. Blooms yellow flowers in winter.  Leaves blush purple gray in winter.  Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Aloe broomii – Snake Aloe – Usually solitary, short-stemmed Aloe to 2- 3′.  Green leaves with brown teeth. Pale greenish yellow flowers are hidden behind the flower bracts. Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Aloe broomii var tarkaenis – Snake Aloe – Differing from species in that the flower can be seen a little bit beyond bracts.
  • Aloe dhufarensis – Dhofar Aloe – Solitary and stemless Aloe to 18″ tall and rosettes 2 – 3′ wide.  Red flowers in Spring.  Hardy to 20 F.  Young plants do not like to be in wet soil in winter.
  • Aloe elegans – A solitary and stemless Aloe to about 2′ with yellow or orange flowers in winter/spring.  Plant in full sun to part sun and hardy 20 about 25 F,
  • Aloe erinacea – This is one of (of many) my favorite Aloes right now.  Winter growing, Small, slow growing to 8 – 12″ tall.  Leaves are armed with white to black spines.  Red flowers opening yellow in winter. Hardy in habitat to 27 F.
  • Aloe ferox – Cape Aloe – A single-stemmed Aloe to 6 – 9’+ with orange-red flowers in winter/spring.  Plant in full sun.  Hardy to 20 F, but flowers may be damaged at 24 F.
  • Aloe humilis – Spider Aloe – Small clumping Aloe to less that 1′ tall with orange-red flowers in winter/spring. Hardy to low 20’s.
  • Aloe lutescens – A suckering, with short stem Aloe to 2 – 3′ with bright red opening to  yellow flowers in winter.  Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Aloe ngongensis – A clumping Aloe to 3 – 5′ with orange  flowers blooming multi times a year. Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Aloe ‘Pepe’ – Hybrid between descoingsii x haworthioides.  Very small clump forming with individual rosettes about 2″.   Not sure about leaving this one outside in winter as hardiness information is all over the place, but guessing no frost for this little guy. Flowers orange-red.
  • Aloe pienaarii – Very similar to Aloe cryptopoda to 3′ tall with orange flowers.  Hardy to 20 – 25F.
  • Aloe ‘Snowstorm’ –  Small clumping Aloe with green and white leaves and orange flowers in winter.  Not hardy to frost and probably best in part sun.
  • Aloe ukambensis – A clumping stemless aloe with leaves up to a yard across.  Red flowers in Fall.  Hardy to 25 F.
  • Aloe vryheidensis – Wolkberg Aloe – A 5′ tall with 3′ wide rosettes on short stems.  Orange flowers in spring.  Hardy to 20 – 25 F.
  • Aloinopsis rosulate – Small succulent/mesemb with green-gray leaves and light pink flowers with red midline stripes.  Winter grower, so dormant in summer and needs little water at this time.  Hardy to 23 F if dry.
  • Carnegiea gigantea – Saguaro Cactus -Very, very slow growing columnar cactus.  Needs protection from hot afternoon sun when young.
  • Cheiridopsis denticulate – Mesemb – Clumping succulent groundcover to 4″ tall,  Winter grower, so wants no to very little water in summer.  Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Echinocereus viereckii spp morcallii – A clumping cactus branching with many nearly spineless ribbed stems to about 20″.  Bloom occur in May with large bright magenta flowers. Hardy to 23 F if dry.
  • Euphorbia brevitorta – A small medusoid Euphorbia to 6″ tall and 12″ wide with twisted stems.  Caudex (or fat, swollen stem, or aboveground root) can reach up 2.5″.  Protect from frost.
  • Euphorbia caput-medusae – A medusoid Euphorbia with many branches (up to 2 – 3′ long) produced from a caudex up to 8″ wide.  Plant in full sun at the coast to light shade inland.  Hardy to about 23 F, and drought tolerant.
  • Euphorbia colliculina – Another medusoid Euphorbia to about 6″ tall and 12″ wide with a caudex with green finger-like stems.  Protect from frost and winter wet I believe.
  • Euphorbia flanaganii – Medusoid Euphorbia to 2″ tall and 12″ wide.  It has a central caudex with fingerlike green stems radiating from out of it.    I have this one growing in my garden with full sun and good drainage.  I would protect from freezes, but they did fine the last couple of years with light frost in my garden.
  • Euphorbia flanaganii crest – Like the plant above only crested.  Looks like a wavy green coral to 6″ tall and 12″ wide.  I have not left this one outside in the winter.  Supposedly hardy to 25 F.
  • Euphrobia gorgonis – Yet another medusoid form of Euphorbia.  I love these cute little guys!  Forms a central 5″ caudex with green stems radiating out it.  Whole plant is about 12″ wide.  Needs a deep pot with a gritty mix.  Supposedly hardy to 25 F, but probably if kept dry.
  • Euphorbia gorgonis (DMC 3874, Motherwell) –  Another slightly different form of the above with arms slightly more stubby than the typical form.
  • Euphorbia groenewaldii – A caudiform succulent with spiral stems with thorns to about 3″ from a central caudex.  Keep dry in the winter
  • Euphorbia inermis var huttonae – A medusoid Euphorbia up 20″ wide with fingerlike stems.  Has yellow, fragrant flowers.  Like a sunny well drained spot.  Hardy to low 20’s, but does not like winter wet.  Lobes are glabrous (without hairs or fuzz) on this variety.
  • Euphorbia inermis var inermis – Same as above except this one has white, fragrant flowers and hairy lobes between the glands.
  • Euphorbia jansenvillensis – Branches to 12 – 18″ that cylindrical, spineless and jointed. Propagates from stolens.
  • Euphorbia monacantha ‘Mrs. Ash’ – A medusoid euphorbia with stems to  about 8″ with beautiful purple-red patterns on a green background.  I am guessing no frost on this little guy or gal.
  • Euphorbia persistens – Forming a caudex with blue-green short stems radiating out with a pattern dark green half circles.
  • Euphorbia sp aff. gorgonis – Mudusoid euphorbia similar to E. gorgonis.
  • Euphorbia stellata – Medusoid euphorbia forming a large caudex to 5 – 6″ tall and 2 – 3″+ in diameter with flattened branches with white markings radiating from the top of the caudex.  Protect from cold and wet in winter.
  • Euphorbia tortirama – A medusoid euphorbia forming a swollen root or caudex to 2 – 3″ in diameter with branches radiating out to 12″ twisted in a tight spiral.  Protect from cold and wet in winter.
  • Euphobia tuberculate – A medusoid form with finger like tubercle-covered (a small raised area or nodule on the plants surface) branches.  Protect from cold and wet in winter.
  • Faucaria tigrina – Tiger Jaws – A small, suckering succulent to about 3″ with large yellow flowers in fall. Grow in bight light and protect from cold and wet in winter.
  • Ferocactus chrysacanthus – A barrel cactus with striking yellow spines to a height of about 2′ and 10″ in diameter.  Protect from cold and wet in winter.  Needs full sun, but avoid wetting the body of barrel cactus when in sun as this may cause scars.
  • Ferocactus echidne – Barrel cactus to about 14″ tall and 8″ in diameter.  Yellow flowers in late winter.  Seems pretty hardy, but not sure about winter wet.
  • Ferocactus gracilis ssp coloratus – Fire Barrel Cactus with red spines.  Grows 4’+ tall  and 12″ in diameter with yellow red-tinged flowers in early summer.   Hardy to 25 F.
  • Ferocactus gracilis ssp gracilis – As above with slightly smaller spines.
  • Huernia hustrix – Porcupine Huernia – Creeping stems to about 3″ with large cream colored flowers with purple banding.  Grow in bright shade with protection from cold and wet in winter.  Flowers smell like rotting meat.
  • Mammillaria elongata Red – A succulent groundcover forming tight clumps of fingerlike stems to about 4″ with red spines.  Grow in bright light and protect from cold and wet in winter.
  • Pleiospilos nelii  – Split rock – A mesemb to about 3″ tall and 4″ in diameter with yellow-orange flowers from spring to mid-summer.  Watering is key to growing these.  Do not water in the summer or the in the dead of winter.  And, when you do water only when soil is dry.  If in doubt, DO NOT WATER!
  • Pleiospilos nelii ‘Royal Flush’ – Same as above only this variety is purple in color and the flower is deep rose.
  • Rebutia narvaecensis – A small clustering cactus to about 1.5″ with rose pink flowers.  Grow in bright light and protect from cold and wet in winter.
  • Stenocereus thurberi – Organ Pipe Cactus with several stems to 16′ growing from a single short trunk.  White flowers that bloom at night.  Hardy to about 25 F.
  • Stetsonia coryne – Argentine Toothpick Cactus – Large columnar cactus to 30′ with white flowers blooming at night. Hardy to 18 F. Drought tolerant.
  • Titanopsis calcarean (fulleri) – Mesemb – Mat forming succulent to about 3″ in diameter.  This selection has crystalline warts on the tips of the leaves instead of occurring on the terinal triangle.  Water ONLY when growing in late fall and early spring. Daisy like orange-red flowers in fall/winter.

New plants available at Peacock Horticultural Nursery

Mediolobivia rosealbiflora

A few new cactus and succulents, as well as, Sansevierias are now available at Peacock Horticultural Nursery:

  • Aloe broomii – 4″pots
  • Aloe cryptopoda – 4″
  • Aloe erinacea – 4″
  • Aloe ferox – one gallon
  • Aloe fosteri – one gallon
  • Aloe marlothii – one gallon
  • Cleistocactus winteri – one gallon
  • Echinocactus texensis – 4″
  • Euphorbia caput-medusa – 4″ & 2 gallon
  • Euphorbia gorgonis – 4″
  • Ferocactus glacescens – 4′ & 2 gallons
  • Ferocactus peninsulae var. vizcainoenis – 4″
  • Ferocactus pilosus – 4″
  • Ferocactus rectispinus – 4″
  • Huernia cv ‘Spiny Norman’ – 4″
  • Mediolobivia rosealbiflora – 4″
  • Rubutia vulpine – 4″
  • Sansevieria cylindrical var patula – 0ne gallon
  • Sansevieria fischeri – one gallon
  • Sansevieria halii – one gallon
  • Sansevieria trifasciata ‘Black Gold’

Ferocactus peninsulae var. vizcainoenis

Euphorbia gorgonis

Ferocactus pilosus

Euphrbia caput-madusae

Ferocactus rectispinus